Aaron N. Tubbs bio photo

Aaron N. Tubbs

Dragon chaser.

Twitter Facebook Google+ LinkedIn Instagram Github

I’ve now completed half of my classic cocktail project. This is, I think, no small feat. When I started the project I had a dozen bottles of liquor. I now have ten times that quantity.

Some liquor.

Exotic, strange, and sometimes downright disgusting liquors and bitters are scattered and hidden wherever they fit. New glassware, mixing pitchers, spoons, strainers, jiggers, dashers, bags, hammers, picks and other nonsense litter my everything drawers.

Some liquor.

It’s been an interesting journey thus far.

We’ll see how the second half of the book goes. I’ve already procured (unless I’ve missed something) all of the difficult-to-find ingredients to complete the book, so now it’s purely a matter of execution.

Some liquor.

There have been several frustrations in terms of ingredients procurement. Erik Ellestad chronicles this sort of problem well. Living in Connecticut, it can be downright impossible to procure some of the ingredients. Our liquor laws and regulations around liquor import are a huge frustration for the classic cocktail enthusiast. Ignoring that, the barely extant, reformulated, and nonexistent ingredients make things challenging if not downright inauthentic. I’ve recently discovered that Lillet Blanc has nothing to do with the original formulation of Kina Lillet. Luckily Tempus Fugit and others have produces liquors that are similar to the original, but now I’ve got some rework to do.

Some liquor.

Many of the classic cocktails thus far have been uninspiring. They are often seminal but have fallen from relevance for a reason. Many prize mildness or sweetness and try to avoid bitterness or intensity. A large quantity of them seem to be hard-set on the sour + sweetener + spirit approach with only mild variation.

Some liquor.

So, we’ll see how the second half of the book goes. It should be interesting. Then I’ll need to start a new project.